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Min. Dachshund
MIN. DACHSHUND  (RED SHORT HAIR)

 AT THIS TIME I AM NOT BREEDING ANY MIN. DACHSHUNDS. I MAY DO DOXI-CHONS OR DOXI-MALTESE IN THE FUTURE.

History

 

: Although completely different from the German Shepherd dog, the Dachshund also hails from Germany, where it was specifically bred to hunt badger. It's title even translates to badger dog in German, with "Dachs" meaning badger and "Hund" meaning dog.


While there are different versions of how exactly the breed materialized, it did not become officially recognized in Germany until 1888, when the German Dachshund Club was established.

The original breed weighed closer to 30-40 pounds and were downsized by ten to fifteen pounds as they began appearing in different European countries more as a pet than a hunter. Although this breed began showing up in America as early as the 1860s and 70s, they were not a recognized group until 1895, when the Dachshund Club of America began. As a pet, this dog did not truly become popular in America until the 1950s, because WWI and WWII propaganda used this breed to depict the Germans, since it is a dog that hails from Germany.

 

Description

 An adorable small dog, this breed is often affectionately referred to as "wiener dogs," as this pooch has a very unique shape. Low to the ground with an elongated midsection, this breed should weigh no more than 20 pounds. There are miniature versions of this breed around, usually only because of breeder selection, that weigh around 14 pounds and are only 5-9 inches in height, while the standard Dachshund stands at 9-10 inches off the ground. Many owners do not know there is a difference between a mini and standard version of this dog, but the miniature version is a nationally recognized breed.

Three different varieties of this breed are available, with the short haired being the most common, followed by the wire haired and the long haired. Brown and black are the dominant coats available for this breed, but there are also gray and black or brown versions as well.

 

Life Span

12-15 years

 

Common Ailments

This breed is prone to poor dental health, which may lead to other physical ailments in the dogs, especially as they get older. The most common ailments for Dachshunds, though, are disc related injuries and disc disease, which may lead to paralysis of the dog. While disc disease cannot be prevented except through carefully selection from a breeder, disc injuries can be prevented by avoiding or allowing these short stature dogs to jump on and off furniture, into and out of cars or playing too rough with other dogs or with their toys.

 

Suitability with Children

Not with small children, although they should do fine with older children.

 

Suitability with Other Pets

 May have a tendency towards aggression, but should be fine if socialized at an early age.

 

Living Conditions

 Can do well in almost any living situation. Will meet its exercise requirements by rough housing inside the home or with short romps in the backyard or around the block.

 

Training

The most important training that the Dachshund can receive is a consistently reinforced housetraining routine when he is a puppy. The breed is known for being difficult to, so if not properly trained as a puppy, they may have difficulty throughout the years.

 

Exercise Required

Low to Medium

 

Cost of Maintenance

Low

 

Breed Temperament

If you drive down any street in a neighborhood in America, you are likely to see a "wiener dog" being walked or out in the front yard with their owner companion. These dogs began making a name for themselves in America in the 1950s and 1960s and have been a popular pet ever since. For owners that are looking for a small dog, but one that still has the attitude of a big dog, this pup fits the bill perfectly. They don’t seem to know how small they are and are absolutely fearless. Of course, this may get them in trouble with large dogs or with other household pets, but if properly socialized from a young age, they should have no problem backing down when necessary.

This breed is excellent for a home where the owners plan to incorporate them into a large portion of their daily lives, as these dogs love being in the spotlight. If an owner doesn’t make time to pay attention to them, whether it be a walk in the park, letting them sit on your lap or a game of tug, they will let you know. Keep in mind that while these dogs crave attention, their small stature requires that owners don’t reward them excessively with treats, as they have a tendency to become. For this reason, it is also necessary to briefly exercise Dachshunds on a daily basis.

 

 



 

MOTHER  (Dam)

 

 

 

FATHER (Sire)